The Award Winning Carbon Reduction Programme for SME's


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Frequently Asked Questions

This section deals with a range of questions regarding both the So-Go-Eco programme and climate change. Please click on the links below to be directed to the appropriate section or, alternatively, you can simply scroll down the page.

 

How much will it cost?

How long will it take?

How can I join the So-Go-Eco scheme?

I'm only a small business, what can I gain from this?

What does it mean by carbon footprint?

What activities contribute to my carbon footprint?

What does CO2e mean?

How will climate change affect me?

Is climate change really happening?

Isn't climate change caused by natural sources?

 

 

How much will it cost?

The So-Go-Eco scheme is bespoke, meaning it is adapted according to a business' size and needs. As such, the cost varies from business to business.  

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How long will it take?

Signing up to the So-Go-Eco programme will provide you with a half day site assessment and participation in a workshop session. From here, you will have your environmental policy, action plan and carbon footprint report along with being successfully registered as Carbon Smart Blue. Your future implementation remains entirely up to you, allowing you to progress at a rate which you are comfortable with.

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How can I join the So-Go-Eco scheme?

To enquire about participating in the So-Go-Eco scheme, simply use the Contact Us page to join now.

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I’m only a small business, what can I gain from this?

It's not only large corporations and manufacturers who can benefit from carbon management, but SMEs as well. On average, SMEs are considered to have 20% saving potential in comparison with larger businesses with 8%. This can represent significant financial savings, as well as environmental recognition and the rewards which this can bring.

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What does it mean by carbon footprint?

A carbon footprint refers to the environmental impact in terms of greenhouse gases of an individual, household, business, activity or even product. Greenhouse gases are associated with nearly all aspects of modern society and can be distinguished as either direct emissions or indirect emissions.

A carbon footprint usually takes both direct and indirect emissions into account.

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What activities contribute to my carbon footprint?

 Scope 2 refers to purchased energy such as electricity, which is used by the company but generated elsewhere.

Scope 3 emissions derive from public transport for employee business travel, emissions from material or item production, waste disposal or the emissions generated from any other aspects of outsourced services or activities.

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What does CO2e mean?

The global warming potential of CO2 is standardised to 1, due to it having the lowest potential of the six greenhouse gases in the basket. The global warming potentials of the other five gases are expressed as a relative factor of CO2. For example, over its lifetime, a quantity of Methane will absorb 25 times more energy than the same quantity of CO2 over a period of 100 years. Due to this, Methane has a global warming potential of 25.

A carbon footprint takes all six basket gases into account, weighing them appropriately according to their relative global warming potential, hence CO2e. However, whilst CO2 may have the lowest potential, the huge quantities of emissions mean it is by far the biggest contributor to climate change.

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How will climate change affect me?

 

With the climatic and physical impacts aside, climate change will have a significant effect on SMEs in the future in terms of legislation and taxes. The Climate Chage Act 2008, and the subsequent 2011 Budget have established challenging targets (34% CO2e reduction by 2020, 80% by 2050) which UK government are legally obliged to meet. This is likely to mean significant increases in energy efficiency and renewable energy, combined with generally lower energy usage across the board. 

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Is climate change really happening?

There is a clear trend demonstrating that global temperatures are increasing, shown by 10 of the last 11 hottest years on record being in the last decade. There have also been observable temperature increases in the world’s oceans. Whilst these changes may appear marginal, it is widely considered that global temperature increases in the range of 1.5 – 4.5°C would have hugely detrimental impacts on world agriculture and sea level.

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Isn’t climate change caused by natural sources? 

Naturally, the planet has an equilibrium between the amount of CO2 produced and the amount of CO2 lost. The amount of CO2 generated by natural sources is in balance with that which is absorbed by natural ‘sinks’ such as the biosphere (plants and trees) and the oceans. Anthropogenic CO2, which is produced by human activities, upsets that balance as the amount produced per year far outweighs the amount which is taken in by the natural sinks. Generally, the first step is to reduce world CO2 emissions so it is level with the amount absorbed, preventing atmospheric concentrations from increasing further.

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